Cell Engineering and Molecular Pharming for Biopharmaceuticals



M.A Abdullah*, 1, Anisa ur Rahmah1, A.J Sinskey2, C.K Rha3
1 Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Tronoh, Perak, Malaysia
2 Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
3 Biomaterials Science and Engineering Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA


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© Abdullah et al.; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/), which permits unrestrictive use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Tronoh, Perak, Malaysia; Tel.: +605-3687636; Fax: +605-3656176; E-mail: azmuddin@petronas.com.my


Abstract

Biopharmaceuticals are often produced by recombinant E. coli or mammalian cell lines. This is usually achieved by the introduction of a gene or cDNA coding for the protein of interest into a well-characterized strain of producer cells. Naturally, each recombinant production system has its own unique advantages and disadvantages. This paper examines the current practices, developments, and future trends in the production of biopharmaceuticals. Platform technologies for rapid screening and analyses of biosystems are reviewed. Strategies to improve productivity via metabolic and integrated engineering are also highlighted.